If you are a word nerd like me, this will make your day. 

thejamieryan:

If you’re reading this site then it is almost guaranteed you also read a wider reaching site such as Engadget, Techcrunch, Gizmodo etc. What I can say with a degree of certainty is that if you read this site you’re an intelligent human being. You probably aren’t gullible, but the Tech press thinks…

I think Jamie is spot on in this article, particularly towards the end where he discusses the way access to prerelease hardware, insider information and free gear affects the coverage of tech companies.

Anyone who claims to be completely objective, devoid of bias, untainted by influence is trying to sell you something.

As discussed recently on the Accidental Tech Podcast, email remains the killer app. I’ve been using Bugshot by Marco Arment quite a bit. I think its a great example of how a simple app that does one thing very well can be more powerful than a feature-laden alternative.Over the past couple weeks I’ve been working on a new iOS app of my own, so I wanted to figure out how best to integrate Bugshot with my desktop woooorkflow.
it turned out to be very easy, thanks to a thoughtful filenames structure: Bugshot_YYYY-MM-DD_HHMMSS.png. On first glance this is obviously useful, as illustrated by the attached screenshots from Mail. Using a combination of Smart Mailboxes & Rules I was able to set up a system that would:
alert me to bugs sent in by people in my VIP group
 automatically forward bugs sent by beta testers to my (imaginary) design team
organize all my received bugs into a series of folders based on age, whether I had replied to them, sender, etc..
Pretty cool for a few minutes of work, and without even looking at even more powerful tools like Applescript, Automator, Hazel, etc.
I’m happy with what I put together. It reminded me that yes, iOS devices are cars. Macs are trucks. Rather than complain about the limitations of a car, its probably better to just hop in the truck and get the job done. 
Interesting Footnote:Bugshot filenames actually retain the timestamp of the original screenshot, not the time the shot is marked up or sent. This opens up a number of possibilities for further automation. 


As discussed recently on the Accidental Tech Podcast, email remains the killer app. I’ve been using Bugshot by Marco Arment quite a bit. I think its a great example of how a simple app that does one thing very well can be more powerful than a feature-laden alternative.Over the past couple weeks I’ve been working on a new iOS app of my own, so I wanted to figure out how best to integrate Bugshot with my desktop woooorkflow.
it turned out to be very easy, thanks to a thoughtful filenames structure: Bugshot_YYYY-MM-DD_HHMMSS.png. On first glance this is obviously useful, as illustrated by the attached screenshots from Mail. Using a combination of Smart Mailboxes & Rules I was able to set up a system that would:
alert me to bugs sent in by people in my VIP group
 automatically forward bugs sent by beta testers to my (imaginary) design team
organize all my received bugs into a series of folders based on age, whether I had replied to them, sender, etc..
Pretty cool for a few minutes of work, and without even looking at even more powerful tools like Applescript, Automator, Hazel, etc.
I’m happy with what I put together. It reminded me that yes, iOS devices are cars. Macs are trucks. Rather than complain about the limitations of a car, its probably better to just hop in the truck and get the job done. 
Interesting Footnote:Bugshot filenames actually retain the timestamp of the original screenshot, not the time the shot is marked up or sent. This opens up a number of possibilities for further automation. 


As discussed recently on the Accidental Tech Podcast, email remains the killer app. I’ve been using Bugshot by Marco Arment quite a bit. I think its a great example of how a simple app that does one thing very well can be more powerful than a feature-laden alternative.Over the past couple weeks I’ve been working on a new iOS app of my own, so I wanted to figure out how best to integrate Bugshot with my desktop woooorkflow.
it turned out to be very easy, thanks to a thoughtful filenames structure: Bugshot_YYYY-MM-DD_HHMMSS.png. On first glance this is obviously useful, as illustrated by the attached screenshots from Mail. Using a combination of Smart Mailboxes & Rules I was able to set up a system that would:
alert me to bugs sent in by people in my VIP group
 automatically forward bugs sent by beta testers to my (imaginary) design team
organize all my received bugs into a series of folders based on age, whether I had replied to them, sender, etc..
Pretty cool for a few minutes of work, and without even looking at even more powerful tools like Applescript, Automator, Hazel, etc.
I’m happy with what I put together. It reminded me that yes, iOS devices are cars. Macs are trucks. Rather than complain about the limitations of a car, its probably better to just hop in the truck and get the job done. 
Interesting Footnote:Bugshot filenames actually retain the timestamp of the original screenshot, not the time the shot is marked up or sent. This opens up a number of possibilities for further automation. 


As discussed recently on the Accidental Tech Podcast, email remains the killer app. I’ve been using Bugshot by Marco Arment quite a bit. I think its a great example of how a simple app that does one thing very well can be more powerful than a feature-laden alternative.Over the past couple weeks I’ve been working on a new iOS app of my own, so I wanted to figure out how best to integrate Bugshot with my desktop woooorkflow.
it turned out to be very easy, thanks to a thoughtful filenames structure: Bugshot_YYYY-MM-DD_HHMMSS.png. On first glance this is obviously useful, as illustrated by the attached screenshots from Mail. Using a combination of Smart Mailboxes & Rules I was able to set up a system that would:
alert me to bugs sent in by people in my VIP group
 automatically forward bugs sent by beta testers to my (imaginary) design team
organize all my received bugs into a series of folders based on age, whether I had replied to them, sender, etc..
Pretty cool for a few minutes of work, and without even looking at even more powerful tools like Applescript, Automator, Hazel, etc.
I’m happy with what I put together. It reminded me that yes, iOS devices are cars. Macs are trucks. Rather than complain about the limitations of a car, its probably better to just hop in the truck and get the job done. 
Interesting Footnote:Bugshot filenames actually retain the timestamp of the original screenshot, not the time the shot is marked up or sent. This opens up a number of possibilities for further automation. 


As discussed recently on the Accidental Tech Podcast, email remains the killer app. I’ve been using Bugshot by Marco Arment quite a bit. I think its a great example of how a simple app that does one thing very well can be more powerful than a feature-laden alternative.Over the past couple weeks I’ve been working on a new iOS app of my own, so I wanted to figure out how best to integrate Bugshot with my desktop woooorkflow.
it turned out to be very easy, thanks to a thoughtful filenames structure: Bugshot_YYYY-MM-DD_HHMMSS.png. On first glance this is obviously useful, as illustrated by the attached screenshots from Mail. Using a combination of Smart Mailboxes & Rules I was able to set up a system that would:
alert me to bugs sent in by people in my VIP group
 automatically forward bugs sent by beta testers to my (imaginary) design team
organize all my received bugs into a series of folders based on age, whether I had replied to them, sender, etc..
Pretty cool for a few minutes of work, and without even looking at even more powerful tools like Applescript, Automator, Hazel, etc.
I’m happy with what I put together. It reminded me that yes, iOS devices are cars. Macs are trucks. Rather than complain about the limitations of a car, its probably better to just hop in the truck and get the job done. 
Interesting Footnote:Bugshot filenames actually retain the timestamp of the original screenshot, not the time the shot is marked up or sent. This opens up a number of possibilities for further automation. 

As discussed recently on the Accidental Tech Podcast, email remains the killer app. 

I’ve been using Bugshot by Marco Arment quite a bit. I think its a great example of how a simple app that does one thing very well can be more powerful than a feature-laden alternative.

Over the past couple weeks I’ve been working on a new iOS app of my own, so I wanted to figure out how best to integrate Bugshot with my desktop woooorkflow.

it turned out to be very easy, thanks to a thoughtful filenames structure: Bugshot_YYYY-MM-DD_HHMMSS.png. On first glance this is obviously useful, as illustrated by the attached screenshots from Mail. 

Using a combination of Smart Mailboxes & Rules I was able to set up a system that would:

  • alert me to bugs sent in by people in my VIP group
  • automatically forward bugs sent by beta testers to my (imaginary) design team
  • organize all my received bugs into a series of folders based on age, whether I had replied to them, sender, etc..

Pretty cool for a few minutes of work, and without even looking at even more powerful tools like Applescript, Automator, Hazel, etc.

I’m happy with what I put together. It reminded me that yes, iOS devices are cars. Macs are trucks. Rather than complain about the limitations of a car, its probably better to just hop in the truck and get the job done. 

Interesting Footnote:
Bugshot filenames actually retain the timestamp of the original screenshot, not the time the shot is marked up or sent. This opens up a number of possibilities for further automation. 



macsacandcrack:

Some sounds just need to be made into a Drum’n’Bass song.

This was one of them.

merlin:

Dan Benjamin Ringtone: “One Was Boy…One Was Girl”

One of my favorite line’s from yesterday’s epic Back to Work (~00:12:29).

Now available free of charge as a ringtone—in both single and irresponsibly looped formats.

You are welcome.

(via merlin)

Sit with this image, and ponder the question. Let it roll over you. Absorb it. Think about it.
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/technology#Noun

Sit with this image, and ponder the question. Let it roll over you. Absorb it. Think about it.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/technology#Noun

Its already arrived.

The most important innovation in smartphones will be a product that is not a smartphone. The category will be eliminated through a disruptive approach just like all other technologies that have come before it. My expectation is that when it comes it won’t be recognized as important or relevant.

parislemon:

Anand Lal Shimpi of AnandTech breaks it down:

With no change to process technology, I can only assume that the reduction in power consumption came from other architectural or silicon optimizations. The significant power reduction is the only thing that makes me wonder if this new A5 silicon isn’t destined for another device, perhaps one powered by a battery. That’s pure speculation however, it could very well be that the A5 in the Apple TV is just lower power for the sake of being better designed.

Overall, it seems like this new custom A5 was made for an economical reason, but those power savings are pretty massive. If only Apple was working on small, battery-powered new iOS device…

“After four and a half intense and wonderful years as CEO of Groupon, I’ve decided that I’d like to spend more time with my family. Just kidding - I was fired today.”

Andrew Mason, in his letter to Groupon employees following his ouster. (Which he posted publicly because “it will leak anyway”.)

A brilliant and refreshingly straightforward way to exit.

(via parislemon)

parislemon:

newsweek:

“I tried to put a bunch of photos and updates on there, plus some tweets and jiffs or whatever. I don’t know. Looks like a liveblog to me.”

The best satire, as always, is extremely close to the actual state of things.

The iWatch concepts are cool, and some are very well done, but they don’t seem to address the real problem with smart watches. They’re too damn big.

I’m a pretty big guy, and I’ve got big hands, but my wrists are skinny and bony. There’s no meat there at all. Big watches just don’t work for me - I’d have to wear one halfway up my arm to keep it from sliding around. Not very convenient if I’m wearing long sleeves or a suit.

So when I wear one at all, I wear this cheap Casio. It tells the time, does splits for runs, and I forget its there.

I made a photostream: https://www.icloud.com/photostream/#A7GgZLKuJ89d9E

It’s a dinky little cheap & functional MENS watch - and that’s the problem. Women’s wrists are smaller, women’s watches are smaller. People have differently shaped bodies, live in different climates, wear different clothes.

Everyone wants comfortable. Nobody likes an awkward fit. So size really matters, and ultimately I think anything they do in this space has to be 1-size-fits-all if it has a chance of being a blockbuster product.

An iWatch HAS to be designed to be worn *on the wrist* by a wide variety of people.

It has to be small enough that its comfortable. It has to be big enough for the guts and a usable screen. It needs to last days if not weeks without charging. It can’t get hot. It can’t crash. It can’t freeze. It can’t lag.

It has to be at least as good as my Casio, and pretty much the same size.

Apple can certainly do all of that. And I’m sure it’ll look great. But they’re not putting an A5 in there, are they? It won’t have LTE. That’s not going to happen. Not for quite some time at least.

I suspect they’ll do something creative with the strap. Put the battery and some antennas in there. Make it flush with the face, and give it an organic shape. A smooth curve that thickens at the display, but resembles a bracelet more than a watch.

It probably won’t do much more than my Jawbone Era. Notifications, Bluetooth & AirPlay, and a microphone for Siri and phone calls.

That’d be a great product. A disappointment. That’s the goal. Don’t blow it by doing too much too fast.

I’ve been thinking about the effects of the internet for a couple of decades now. I’ve watched industry after industry forced to renegotiate their methods and models, in the face of a medium that allows for perfect copying, global distribution, zero incremental cost, ridiculously easy group-forming: The music business. Newspapers. Travel agents. Publishers. Hotel owners. And while watching, I’ve always wondered what I’d do when my turn came.

And now here it is. And it turns out my job is to tell you not to trust us when we claim that there’s something sacred and irreplaceable about what we academics do. What we do is run institutions whose only rationale—whose only excuse for existing—is to make people smarter.

merlin:

70Decibels - Generational - 021 - Raising a Human [MP3; Huffduffer]

Generational 021 - “Raising a Human” on Huffduffer

This week Gabe is joined by Merlin Mann to talk about raising a kid. They talk about the fears, mistakes, and joys of raising a child and screwing them up in their own special way. The discussion ranges from death to religion to Miyazaki films.

You can totally be forgiven for not loving all the parenting talk out there. Trust me, I hated it with a passion until the last few years.

But, if you are vaguely interested in the challenges, annoyances, strategies, and occasional minor triumphs around trying to help craft a person who’s not a total basket case, I hope you’ll check this out.

I really like Gabe a lot, and I love how this turned out.

(Related: if you haven’t seen Gabe’s amazing “Normal is Not Normal” post, please do treat yourself.)

My wife and I both loved this episode. Lots of discussion after.

merlin:

“Keep Watching, Internet Bozos.”

“I want them to watch that.”

Understand: my daughter is trying to help you.

Your daughter is gonna take over the world.

parislemon:

I swear I just read something about Dick Tracy and Apple’s iWatch… Oh, that’s right: I wrote it 10 days ago.

But Nick Bilton of NYT does add quite a bit to the notion, namely sources pointing to the use of curved glass (WSJ follows this up with a largely “us too” article). He also writes:

Mr. Cook is clearly interested in wearables. In the past he has been seen sporting a Nike FuelBand, which tracks a user’s daily exertion. The FuelBand data is shared wirelessly with an iPhone app.

And he has a picture at the top of the post featuring Tim Cook wearing a FuelBand. Oddly not mentioned though is the fact that Cook has a very good reason to be wearing the device: he’s on Nike’s board of directors.

That brings up another interesting question: if and when Apple does move into this space, what would this mean for Cook’s role on Nike’s board? It’s a situation that could play out in a similar way to Eric Schmidt on Apple’s board a few years back.

At first, Schmidt would recuse himself from the parts of meetings where the iPhone was being discussed (once Google’s Android plans were revealed). Then the conflict became too great. And this eventually led to him stepping down (or being pushed) from the board. Maybe Nike doesn’t view the FuelBand as a massive business to be protected right now, but down the road…

The iWatch will kill the smartphone.